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hullodearie:

Fake Pockets: A How To

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WKCO

Playing classic hits alllllllllllll about the human body this afternoon.

Tune in now to Kicking It Old School on WKCO!

spacettf:

The Helix Nebula in Aquarius by Astroshed on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: Popularly but not officially known as the Eye of God, this is the Helix Nebula, NGC7293 is a planetary nebula roughly 700 light years away and about 2 light years across. This image combines RGB and Narrowband images at wildly different scales using a combination of RGB from an RC16 with Apogee U9000 with Ha+OIII from FSQ106ED at f3.7 with SBIG ST10xe.

spacettf:

The Helix Nebula in Aquarius by Astroshed on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Popularly but not officially known as the Eye of God, this is the Helix Nebula, NGC7293 is a planetary nebula roughly 700 light years away and about 2 light years across.

This image combines RGB and Narrowband images at wildly different scales using a combination of RGB from an RC16 with Apogee U9000 with Ha+OIII from FSQ106ED at f3.7 with SBIG ST10xe.

astronomicalwonders:

A Close Up Of Star Formation
This very detailed enhanced-colour image from ESO’s Very Large Telescope shows the dramatic effects of very young stars on the dust and gas from which they were born in the star-forming region NGC 6729. The baby stars are invisible in this picture, being hidden behind dust clouds at the upper left of the picture, but material they are ejecting is crashing into the surroundings at speeds of that can be as high as one million kilometres per hour. This picture was taken by the FORS1 instrument and records the scene in the light of glowing hydrogen and sulphur.
Credit: ESO/Sergey Stepanenko

astronomicalwonders:

A Close Up Of Star Formation

This very detailed enhanced-colour image from ESO’s Very Large Telescope shows the dramatic effects of very young stars on the dust and gas from which they were born in the star-forming region NGC 6729. The baby stars are invisible in this picture, being hidden behind dust clouds at the upper left of the picture, but material they are ejecting is crashing into the surroundings at speeds of that can be as high as one million kilometres per hour. This picture was taken by the FORS1 instrument and records the scene in the light of glowing hydrogen and sulphur.

Credit: ESO/Sergey Stepanenko

timetrabble:

Time Trabble - Illusion [x]
Time Trabble by Mikey Heller [webcomic | website | tumblr | twitter]

timetrabble:

Time Trabble - Illusion [x]

Time Trabble by Mikey Heller
[webcomic | website | tumblr | twitter]